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When should you Exit a Stock?

Many stock market investors are like Abhimanyu. They know how to enter a stock, but fail miserably when it comes to exiting, says Sunil Damania.In the Mahabharata, Abhimanyu, son of Arjun, knew how to enter the chakravyuha but was not aware of how to exit it.This cost him his life.*Many stock market investors are like Abhimanyu.*They know how to enter a stock, but fail miserably when it comes to exiting.Unless investors get both their entry and exit strategies right, even if they buy a scrip at the right level, chances are they will not make money from it.Ask investors who bought Vakrangee, P C Jewellers, or Manpasand Beverages.All these stocks had moved up substantially, but investors who did not sell at the appropriate time are sitting on huge losses today.Investors live in the hope that the company they hold will be a mega performer.They think that a stock that has fallen will bounce back soon. Often, this hope is belied. A scrip may take more than a decade to regain investors'…

Valuable tips for Effective Selling

*1. LEAD CALLS*Don’t call someone more than twice continuously. If he does not respond, it simply means that he is doing something more important.*2. PUNCTUALITY*Let us understand that we are into Life Insurance business where competition is highest. PUNCTUALITY plays a very important role in image building which is essential ingredient of this business. If you have made a commitment to a prospect, honour it at any cost. For certain unavoidable reason if you are unable to honour the commitment, inform the prospect well in advance. Don't keep the prospect waiting.*3. MANNERISM*PERSONALITY SPEAKS ABOUT THE STYLES WE DISPLAY, BUT CHARACTER IS THE SUBSTANCE WITHIN. IN THE LONG RUN SUBSTANCE WILL ALWAYS OUTLAST STYLE.*4. CAUSING EMBARASSMENT*Don’t ask questions which will embarass the prospect. Avoid questions which are personal in nature like his marital status, owning a house etc. "why are you not married? Why don’t you have your own house? etc. For god’s sake these are not yo…

The Perception surrounding your Money

On June 25, 2020, Dev Ashish, a SEBI registered investment adviser, tweeted: Many DIY investors are DIY not because they are capable, but because they want to avoid paying any fee.The responses to that were very interesting.One said that he burnt his fingers and so became a Do-It-Yourself (DIY) investor. Another said that he did not get sufficient value from his financial planner. Others suggested that the integrity and competence of the IFAs should also be considered.The perception around money is fascinating. And advisers should never downplay the emotional element of money. It is experiences that shape a client’s perception, and the financial adviser will have to combat that to earn someone’s trust and confidence.If you are an adviser, ask your potential client these questions. You should even try it with existing clients who are difficult, who question you needlessly or never listen to what you say. Their answers will help you tackle the emotion and cloudy reasoning that is jeopar…

Importance of Financial Advice

Picture this. You are on a surgical table, your insides open and the one performing the surgery on you is you! When you have woken from that nightmare, let's talk about doing something less scary, yet daunting no doubt -- investing your money.You have been working for some time now. The end of a financial year always reminds you that you can save taxes by making investments. So do banks and other financial institutions who nudge you to invest for a better tomorrow. You want to get better at managing and growing your money, you've probably even researched a bit about investing. You are at a crossroads and are wondering: *should I invest by myself or seek an advisor?* Here are factors to weigh in for each choice:*Do-It-Yourself*There is a lot to know.Let's face it. What we should do with our money is everybody's top concern. There is a lot of information out there on the Internet -- on blogs, videos and mobile apps -- about money management and investing. But simply havi…

The 4 -Pillars of Investing

William Bernstein is fascinating in more ways than one. He began his career as a neurologist and then transitioned to being a financial theorist and money manager. Add the dozen-odd books he has authored, and you get an extremely prolific writer.One analogy that he presented during an interview stuck. Investing is like losing weight.To lose weight, you have to exercise more, eat less and eat right. Simple, but not easy. To become wealthy, you have to save more, spend less, and invest right.Simple, but not easy.His thoughts and writings have a place in any serious conversation about investing. Yet, they are elegant in their simplicity. One of them being the four pillars of investing.According to him, mastery of them can result in a coherent strategy that will enable individuals to accomplish investing’s primary aims: achieving and maintaining financial independence and sleeping well at night. A deficiency in any of them will torpedo your investment plan.The below has been extracted fro…

Investor Psychology vis-a-vis Market Movements

There are no market geniuses. Just those savvy in controlling their emotions. You can never get wealthy if you let emotion get the better of you. But if you rein in your impulses, you have a very good shot to accumulate wealth.When the market is bullish, everyone is on an investing spree. Along comes the inevitable correction, and those very funds are kicked to the curb. What has changed? Just sentiment.If the market falls on a certain day, fear dominates and investors are reluctant to invest. Once the market bounces back, greed takes over. Ironically is, investors perceive an investment to be more risky when nobody is buying and the price (NAV) is low, and less risky when everyone is buying and the price (NAV) is high. Laughable isn't it?How does one counter the impulse to act? Give thought to your Investment.Value investing is about buying a stock or fund quoting less than its intrinsic value. If you make a purchase higher than its intrinsic value, you are looking at the greater…

Alpha and Beta in Mutual funds investing

*What Are Alpha And Beta In Investing?*As their names would imply, alpha and beta are fundamental terms in the investing world. In its most popular understanding, alpha represents the excess return on a particular investment—a stock, mutual fund or exchange-traded fund—over a relevant index. In other words, if an investor has managed to outperform a certain index, such as the S&P 500, it is said he or she has achieved "alpha."Beta, by contrast, measures an asset's historic volatility relative to a market benchmark, such as the S&P 500, which has an alpha and a beta of 1.0 because it is considered to be a proxy for the overall stock market. If a stock or fund's beta is 2, for example, that means that it has historically been twice as volatile as the benchmark index, while a beta below 1.0 would indicate that is less volatile than the market.The simplest way to differentiate between alpha and beta is to remember that alpha measures relative performan…